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Wednesday, 20 August 2014

Hampshire Delights Part 3....

On our last full day in Hampshire we set off for Portsmouth, where our aim was to spend all day in the Historic Dockyard with the express intention of seeing The Mary Rose Exhibition, something we have been wanting to see for years but never had the opportunity to do.  Of course there are lots more attractions in the dockyard, which I will share with you, but I have always had a fascination with Henry Tudor and of course The Mary Rose was his flagship.  The following photographs show the timbers of the Mary Rose in situ in the museum,  the grey pipes are blowing warm air over the timbers to dry them out slowly.   Everything is behind glass at the moment but the plan is to remove the glass in four years time. 



 After serving for 33 years in several wars against France, Scotland and Brittany and after being substantially rebuilt in 1536, she saw her last action on 19 July 1545. While leading the attack on the galleys of a French invasion fleet, she sank in the Solent, the straits north of the Isle of Wight. The wreck of the Mary Rose was rediscovered in 1971 and salvaged in 1982 by the Mary Rose Trust in one of the most complex and expensive projects in the history of maritime archeology.   By pure coincidence our visit on 20th July 2014 was 469 years almost to the day after The Mary Rose sank.

There were many artefacts recovered from the wreck. This is the gun that identified the Mary Rose,
  and this gun with Henry's crest.


The surgeon's chest was found containing many of his implements.



Skeletons were found and were identified
which enabled them to reconstruct a fair representation of how they would have looked.
and the tools of his trade.
Of course there is so much more to see and we spent a fascinating two hours in the exhibition and fully intend to go back in four years time when the glass screens and air pipes are removed to see the Mary Rose properly.

We had a quick lunch in one of the many cafe/restaurants before our next visit to Nelson's Flagship - Victory, a 104-gun first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, laid down in 1759 and launched in 1765. She is most famous as Lord Nelson's flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, but she was also Keppel's flagship at Ushant, Howe's flagship at Cape Spartel and Jervis's flagship at Cape St Vincent. After 1824 she served as a harbour ship.  In 1922 she was moved to a dry dock  and preserved as a museum ship. She is the flagship of the First Sea Lord since October 2012 and is the world's oldest naval ship still in commission
We were allowed to go on board
and below decks, where we were fascinated to see how the sailors of the day lived their lives,


 how they cooked,






 and slept.
Then back on deck











Then, as we were leaving,  the view from Britain's oldest commissioned warship (HMS Victory) looking at one of the very latest warships, a type 45 destroyer (HMS Dragon)!
Just time for a quick coffee and sit down before visiting HMS Warrior.

 Here's a true story about Warrior's Figurehead in the previous photo.
HMS Warrior, launched in 1860, was the pride of Queen Victoria's fleet. Powered by steam and sail, she was Britain's first iron-hulled, armoured warship and the largest, fastest and most powerful ship of her day. Warrior was, in her time, the ultimate deterrent, yet within a few years became obsolete.  Restored and back at home in Portsmouth, Warrior now serves as a ship museum, monument, visitor attraction, private venue.

We boarded this beautiful ship to look around.

Below decks the galley was certainly larger than the one on the Victory.
Seamen's belongings all organised.


Their rum ration.
Part of the Armoury.
The Engine room.
Another fascinating piece of our naval history which is well worth a visit.

Unfortunately, after 5 hours of sightseeing it was time to head back to our coach to get back to the hotel for dinner and packing for the journey home the following day.  

The following morning we set off for home just after breakfast but had one last stop on the way home, for lunch at Royal Lemington Spa with it's famous Bath House and Pump Room.
The Royal Pump Room and Baths is a Grade II listed building.  It was the most famous of several spa baths opened in Leamington between the late-18th and mid-19th centuries. People would travel from throughout the country, and indeed Europe,  to benefit from treatments using the town's healing waters. When 'taking the waters' became less fashionable after the mid-19th century the Pump Rooms became Leamington's only surviving spa facility, later also being extended to include the town's public swimming pool. After a major redevelopment in 1997 - 99 the building now houses Leamington Spar Art Gallery and Museum, a public library, a tourist information centre, cafe and assembly rooms.

The impressive Town Hall
and gardens.


After a pleasant lunch and walk in the sunshine taking in the sights of this delightful town, it was time to continue our journey home.

I can thoroughly recommend Hampshire for it's beauty and as a base to visit places of historical interest.

Hope you enjoyed our trip as much as we did.
The Tudor ship that captured the world's imagination when she was raised from the seabed in 1982 is the only sixteenth century warship on display anywhere in the world and the brand new Museum built around her reunites her with many of her 19,000 artefacts and crew. - See more at: http://www.historicdockyard.co.uk/maryrose/#sthash.Yvx5pTfX.dpuf

The Tudor ship that captured the world's imagination when she was raised from the seabed in 1982 is the only sixteenth century warship on display anywhere in the world and the brand new Museum built around her reunites her with many of her 19,000 artefacts and crew. - See more at: http://www.historicdockyard.co.uk/maryrose/#sthash.Yvx5pTfX.dpuf
The Tudor ship that captured the world's imagination when she was raised from the seabed in 1982 is the only sixteenth century warship on display anywhere in the world and the brand new Museum built around her reunites her with many of her 19,000 artefacts and crew. - See more at: http://www.historicdockyard.co.uk/maryrose/#sthash.Yvx5pTfX.dpuf

16 comments:

Ron said...

What an utterly fascinating post! Besides trains, I have always had an interest in old ships (like the Titanic), so I would have really enjoyed this exhibition.

"Skeletons were found and were identified, which enabled them to reconstruct a fair representation of how they would have looked."

That's amazing!

Also, I love the second photograph of the Victory. What a gorgeous ship!

Thanks for sharing, m'dear. Thoroughly enjoyed!
X

Akelamalu said...

Ron I could have spent at least another two days at the dockyard there is so much to see but we just didn't have any more time! When we go again in four years time we intend staying close to Portsmouth so we can see everything we missed at the dockyard this time. It was all so fascinating!

Banker Chick said...

Oh how I have enjoyed your trip. I think Mr BC would have enjoyed part 3 as he loves ships of any age. I have followed with interest anything that has been produced about the Mary Rose and remember when it was found...how, exciting that it will be available in 4 years to see her up close. Thank you for the pictures.

Akelamalu said...

Raising the Mary Rose was such a fantastic feat I think it captured everyone's imagination BankerChick. I can't wait to see an unrestricted view of the remains.

Cloudia said...

The UK has SO much to be proud of!
This excellent post should come to the attention of school children who could benefit greatly from this virtual visit.

I loved this, Ake


ALOHA from Honolulu
ComfortSpiral
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Beach Bum said...

My wife and I just saw a travel documentary on the HMS Victory last weekend.

Your post has gotten me in the mood for a return trip to see the USS Yorktown down in Charleston. Unfortunately, that ship is not taken care of like Victory and Warrior.

Valerie said...

Joe likes his trains, I like ships and boats so I would dearly have liked to see all this in person. Never mind, I learned a lot from this post. Thank you, Pearl.

That's a great picture of you in the engine room.

Akelamalu said...

Thankyou Cloudia, I'm glad you enjoyed it. X

They are very special and really well looked after Beach. X

I hope you get to see them for yourself someday Valerie, they are so worth a visit, xx

Secret Agent Woman said...

What an interesting exhibit. I love touring things like that!

Daryl said...

i love seeing the world with you two .. and as i read these recaps i wonder what you'll post after you visit here .. can't wait!

Akelamalu said...

Me too SAW, x

I can't wait either Daryl, not long now. Xx

MorningAJ said...

Years ago I saw a travelling exhibition of the Mary Rose finds but I've not seen the permanent exhibition. Nice photos. Thanks for the tour. I particularly like the reconstructed man. He looks like a nice guy. Brings it home more, somehow, doesn't it?

Akelamalu said...

The exhibition is fantastic AJ and that's exactly how I felt about the reconstructed man!

Julia said...

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CrystalChick said...

What amazing pieces of history! Ah, the skeleton and reconstruction... quite neat!
I feel like I could use a nice European spa bath with some healing waters. Oh well, I'll have to settle for a soak in my bathtub and a few drops of lavender oil. lol
Of course you will go back to see the Mary Rose minus the glass in 4 years!! :)

Mike @ A Bit About Britain said...

You certainly packed a lot in! Pompey is my home town and I have visited the Dockyard many times - but not made it onto Mary Rose yet. Great post.